Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

I’m honored to have been featured on the Chief Marketing Technologist blog in a Q&A with Scottagiliti_framework Brinker.

This is definitely one of the best marketing technology resources on the web, and I highly recommend subscribing to the blog if you’re not already an avid reader.

The Q&A was focused around our digital transformation work — getting beyond the buzzword. 

This feature was a small preview of a session I’ll be presenting at the first MarTech conference in Boston this August. Hope to see you there!

 

 

 

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ommaYesterday was the second OMMA Social conference hosted by the fine folks from MediaPost. I moderated a panel that focused on strategy titled “As Social Media Grows, How Not to Miss the Forest for the Trees”.Marketers and agencies tend to focus on the “shiny new thing” – first it was MySpace, then Facebook, now Twitter, and there were even the moments of Second Life (ugh) and other platforms and digital sub-channels. At some point in the not too distant future it will be something else. Additionally, platforms like Wikipedia and Flickr and YouTube and Delicious all have a place in our arsenal of presence, as do some of the smaller second tier social sites, but most marketers don’t seem to methodically determine objective and develop strategies, but rather run into these channels simply because consumers are there and they need to follow. Aftrer all fishing where the proverbial fish are is what us marketers do, right? But without a strategy for the long term fundamental shift in how brands can engage consumers in social media, taking into account the multi-disciplinary nature of these platforms, companies may be headed in the wrong direction due to shortsightedness.

The official description and panelists that I hand selected for this important topic of social media strategy are below. The audience was full of laptops blogging and tweeting the conference, maybe more so than I have seen before. In fact here is a great blog post that summarizes our panel.

As Social Media Grows, How Not to Miss the Forest for the Trees  
Tweets, Facebook apps, MySpace pages, YouTube channels, and blogging are all trees in a large social media forest, and given the forest’s increasing density, it’s getting easier and easier to get lost. In fact, many marketers are jumping into the channels and tactics of social media without spending enough time focusing on objectives and strategies. Marketers and agencies will discuss how to use the channels that fit their strategies, rather than let channels dictate them.  

Moderator 
Jason Heller, EVP, Laredo Group  
 
Panelists 
Ian Schafer, CEO, Deep Focus 
Shiv Singh, VP, Global Social Media Lead, Razorfish 
Denise Sposato, Director of Communities, H&R Block 
Don Steele, VP, Digital Marketing, MTVN Entertainment Group  

You can read the Twitter stream for all Omma Social posts (#ommasocial) here.

Apparently the video of the panels will be up in a week or so here.

dgdYesterday I had the honor of being the emcee for two half day conferences, DigiDay Mobile & DigiDay Social. During hard economic times, the turnout for these conferences was actually almost shocking. I was amazed to see a standing room only crowd as early as 7:45am.  This was the first mobile and social media conference for DM2 Events (soon to be renamed DigiDay Events, I believe), run by Nick Friese, formerly of MediaPost & OMMA.

If you couldn’t make it in person, there were many attendees in the audience posting play-by-play sound bytes via Twitter, and others blogging about it. Presentations will be available via slideshare as well.

While it was a long day chock full of interesting presentations, I’ll whittle it down to a few paragraphs…

DigiDay Mobile

The mobile conference kicked off the morning discussing the elephant in the room – the economy. The main take away was that although many marketers still look at mobile as an experimental channel, usage and adoption among consumers is still increasing. The ability to easily integrate mobile into an overall marketing mix presents tremendous opportunities to engage consumers.

The presentation that resonated most with me and many of the conference attendees was by Jeremy Wright from Nokia (co-founder of Enpocket, which was acquired by Nokia several years ago). Jeremy provided a truly global perspective of how ubiquitous and powerful the mobile channel has become, how in emerging markets the mobile web is THE web, how the world is becoming clickable, and how reach matters (imagine that).

DigiDay Social

This was a fun event to emcee. Social media marketing is the hottest topic in the marketing world today. Everything is becoming infused with social media tools and experiences, and the tipping point on diving into the social media world is behind us. It is no longer a “nice to have” capability for an agency, nor an ancillary tactic for marketers – social media marketing has become its own discipline and requires the strategic planning and acumen as any other marketing discipline.

The opening keynote for the social media conference was Scott Monty from Ford.  Scott has become a social media brand himself and has helped Ford become a leader in social media for the automotive category. His keynote focused on how Ford uses various social channels to connect with consumers. Ford’s positioning is “Drive One” and their social media positioning is “Meet One”.

Other notable presentations included a case study by Don Steele, VP Digital Marketing for MTV Networks, who preached engaging consumers where they habituate online. The four pillars of MTVN’s social strategy: Organic, Smart, Engaging, Honest. It was great to hear about how MTV works within and monitors social networks, social bookmarks, picture and video sharing sites, Wikipedia and more. This was one of the few holistic presentations I’ve heard in a while. Way to go Don!

The panel on social media measurement and ROI, as expected, was a highly tweeted panel. Although there are no standards for measuring social media ROI, it’s become a given that as any business investment, it has to have a return, even if the return is hard to measure and part of a bigger picture – which of course social media is on both counts.

The last panel of the day was about “What are you doing/buying right now? Where can you get the best ROI on your social marketing investment?” – this panel reflected the advertising side of social media, a topic not discussed for most of the day that focused on the marketing applications versus advertising. Although audience members probably wanted to walk away with a short list on what to buy beyond Facebook and MySpace, not many specifics were discussed. Although mainly focused on advertising, the panel reminded the audience that social media is still about providing value to the consumer  and engaging them in the right manner. A solid point driven home was that the “click” is inherently an anti-social behavior – why make someone move away from a social activity they are participating in (not that anyone is foolish enough to use clicks to measure anything, right?!?). Panlist Eric Wheeler, CEO of 33Across helped to end the panel with a great line that he quoted from David Olgilvy  “Never stand between a client and their drink.”… and a lively cocktail hour (or two) followed!

See you at the next event!

I moderated a panel at the OMMA Global conference today titled “Competing With Search”, which I thought from day 1 was an interesting title, but somewhat of a misnomer for any conversation relating to digital media. I knew then that this would make for an interesting panel and hoped for some different perspectives and opinions (after all, what fun is a panel when everyone just agrees on everything).

The official description was:

Search advertising continues to attract 40% of today’s online ad budgets, and some projections have search growth continuing to outpace display spending over the next decade. Plus, the direct response model seems to have affected the success metrics applied to all campaigns. How do publishers-armed with a portfolio of display, email, video and sponsorships compete with almighty search for budgets that increasingly demand ROI? How are publishers making the case with clients to maintain or grow their non-search budgets. Is video proving to be a hedge against budgets moving to search? Can a content provider create unique packages that complement or replace parts of a search spending strategy? How can sales teams create compelling display and direct response programs that complement and enhance existing search spends? And how can the sites themselves use search engines to increase the value of their own inventory to clients?

I’ll pull out a few interesting sound bites from the panel…

  • The panel agreed that it’s not about “competing with search” for web publishers, but rather maximizing the value of an audience and packaging advertising in a way that maximizes monetization
  • The last-ad attribution model is broken and unfairly credits search for the entire influence chain rather than the activation of it. Multiple attribution protocol needs to emerge as the standard and is emerging far too slowly. Agencies and marketers need more education about these things.
  • The impression doesn’t mean anything – the value of the impression matters. Applied data helps increase the value of the impression.
  • Video can create emotionally compelling consumer experiences, but successfully adding video to a website requires good content, which requires a real investment.
  • MySpace is apparently so big that Jason Oberfest calls a site with 10 – 20 million unique users “mid-sized” (for the record 10 – 20 million uniques is still quite big, it’s just not MySpace big)
  • Scale matters when it comes to addressability, segmentation and the maximization of profitability for publishers

Ok, no revelations made, but the air was cleared for many in the room. I directed the audience to check out Atlas’ Engagement Mapping demo, and also mentioned Doubleclick’s Multiple Attribution Protocol, neither of which are perfect sciences, both of which are far better than the last ad standard and help to more accurate apply credit to advertising influence.